Long ago, before the Queensland Tennis Centre was erected, the Tennyson Powerhouse (1 2 3) overlooked the Brisbane river on the southside. The spectacular plant stood dormant for many years before being torn down, but not before I managed to get a few shots off. The building was a very well known feature of the city, and I’m sure I don’t need to explain the curiousness of teenagers.

The Scooby Doo (2002) movie’s opening sequence was filmed inside the power station, as well as other sections of the movie around Queensland.

The station was demolished in April 2006 by the Rosenlund corporation, and details of the final days of the building, plus a demolition video, can be seen here.

The following photos were most likely taken between 10-13 years ago on a disposable camera, so pardon the quality.


The path we’d take to get to the power station would lead us along the riverbank, presenting us with this awesome view. All of my current interests in Urban Exploration have arisen from this one experience.

The electrical equipment you can see on the left in the above photo was 1 of several still-active substations surrounding the plant.


A view of the middle tower on the rooftop, looking out from the end one (if you were looking front on, left to right). The roof wasn’t in great condition, so there weren’t any pictures taken from the higher level (and no access anyway apart from rusty ladders).


The inside of the plant, near the front. Through the massive girder structure you can see the plant’s front windows to the left, and its left-side windows at the far end.


The image above was taken in the far-right corner, looking across the back of the plant. There are much better photos of this exact section elsewhere on the web, but this is one of my personal favourites from my collection.


Standing on one of the concrete piers looking up the Brisbane river. A lot of the cooling tunnels from inside the plant ended up in the river right beside the pier.


A sign on a small building just outside the station reads “This building contains chlorine gas”.


A spectacular view of the Brisbane river from the back of the power station. Across the river is the Indooroopilly Golf Club. Around the bank to the right is Yeronga, which eventually forms the Brisbane Corso.


Another gloomy shot of the inside of the plant. This one is taken with my back to the front, looking towards the back hall. Directly above us were some dark-windowed box-like rooms attached to the ceiling of the plant, presumably offices or something similar.

At the time, it didn’t look like we were the only ones that had been inside, so we steered clear of areas like that. We weren’t about to disturb some drug-crazed homeless people, were we?


A glimpse of the front-lawn of the station, caught while we were moving back down the stairs from the roof.


Another shot of the back of the plant, taken from the pier.


Looking in the direction of Yerongpilly from the roof.


The second substation still active on-site, looking in the direction of Rocklea.

If you have any pictures, comments, or would like to ask a question, I’d love to hear from you (post in the comments or check out the Contact page). I also have larger copies of all the photos shown here.